• Sign Up! To view all forums and unlock additional cool features

    Welcome to the #1 Fiesta ST Forum and Fiesta ST community dedicated to Fiesta ST owners and enthusiasts. Register for an account, it's free and it's easy, so don't hesitate to join the Fiesta ST Forum today!

Brake fluid levels - reservoir INSANITY

babyivan

Senior Member
Messages
986
Likes
523
Location
Queens
#1
I am having issues with trying to figure out brake fluid levels.

The manual shows a standard reservoir with a MIN and MAX line, but our car has 2 reservoirs. Through some digging on the forum and Reddit, I was able to discern that there actually is a level indicator on the main reservoir (not the fill up one).

Very hard to see but I managed to take a picture and there's only a minimum (MIN) line indicator.

On the secondary reservoir that you actually fill with fluid, there's a line/ridge internally and a line on the outside that corresponds with it, but there are no markings as to what exactly that line represents. *Pics below.
I assume that's the maximum line, but of course there's no documentation in our manual or specific indication like a "MAX" next to that line.

Perhaps someone with more knowledge on the matter can confirm to me that my assumptions are correct.

FYI, I'm planning to do the front pads and rotors this weekend, and will do it according to @D1JL (open bleed valve on caliper, rather than pushing fluid back up into the master).

I do plan on doing a full fluid flush, just not at the moment, and will probably just do a gravity bleed (Fill reservoir to the top, crack bleeders, have a beer), as that is the simplest and least harmful way that I know of.


 


Last edited:
OP
babyivan

babyivan

Senior Member
Messages
986
Likes
523
Location
Queens
Thread Starter #2
Update:

Seems as though my guess was correct, the internal ridge corresponds with the line and yes that is the max level of our system. Found a video on YouTube that shows this to be true (ASE tech).

Did a gravity bleed of the whole system prior to doing the brakes. This allowed me to slowly push the caliper piston back in (loosened reservoir cap to relieve any pressure) without worrying about dirty fluid going back up and contaminating the ABS system.

Technically, there's still fluid in the ABS block when you bleed that doesn't get cleaned out unless you cycle the module using forscan (or get it to activate via some hard braking).
Not too worried about that, it's such a small amount and no doubt changing all the fluid around it will make that little amount a non issue.
However, I will do another gravity bleed next year, being sure to activate the ABS a couple of times just before doing it.

FYI, I went with the dusty AF OEM pads and rotors. I made sure to bed the brakes as well. Quite pleased, as the breaking pedal feels as it did when I first bought the car.
 


Messages
474
Likes
325
Location
Cleveland
#3
I kill my fluid and I don't cycle the ABS pump. I do not find it necessary, the fluid should technically spread out and mix. The amount is inconsequential to me.

I suggest a Powerbleeder. It makes bleeding brakes very quick and easy.
 


OP
babyivan

babyivan

Senior Member
Messages
986
Likes
523
Location
Queens
Thread Starter #4
I kill my fluid and I don't cycle the ABS pump. I do not find it necessary, the fluid should technically spread out and mix. The amount is inconsequential to me.

I suggest a Powerbleeder. It makes bleeding brakes very quick and easy.
I don't mess around with pressure or vacuum bleeders, two man bleeds, speed bleeders, etc. I always found that gravity bleed is the way to go. First and foremost it's foolproof, and is the least impactful on the system; no pulling, no pushing, no pumping. I prefer the gentle touch. There is a reason why they recommend you do it for older and vintage cars.
And, I don't mind taking the extra time out to do it. I'm in no hurry.

I 100% agree about the ABS fluid, but it couldn't hurt to do another flush next year anyways. Get the system even cleaner.
 


TemecFist

Active member
Messages
698
Likes
483
Location
Temecula
#5
Do you have to open 1 bleeder at a time, or can you open all 4 at once and let them bleed?
 


PunkST

2000 Post Club
Messages
2,239
Likes
1,374
Location
Menasha
#6
Its probably better to one at a time it. That way you aren't playing beat the clock with a draining master cylinder.
 


LilPartyBox

1000 Post Club
Premium Account
Messages
1,213
Likes
467
Location
NYC
#7
There's an explicit order to bleeding. One at a time, start with caliper closest to the master and end with the furthest. And i also use the Motive Power Bleeder on all of my cars and will never bleed without one again.
 


Ford ST

2000 Post Club
Messages
2,540
Likes
2,340
Location
Pleasant Garden
#8
You normally start with the one that's farthest away and work towards the master cylinder. That's old school bleeding 101 farthest away work towards master cylinder.

I actually try to look up what the manufacturer recommends because I have found different vehicles have different bleeding orders.

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
 


Last edited:

LilPartyBox

1000 Post Club
Premium Account
Messages
1,213
Likes
467
Location
NYC
#9
Ur right. They do have diff bleeding orders. I may have quoted what they want for my minivan
 


Similar threads



Top