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Need help taking out a bolt without a head

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Location
Virginia Beach, VA, USA
#1
This is very embarrassing but I was recently installing a new Turbosmart BOV onto my fiesta today. I used to have a boomba bov spacer on so I had to go buy some new M6 bolts. I picked up M6-1 that were 22 inches long. I found out later these were too long... When I was installing the BOV, I overtightened the bolt and the head broke off😞. The car held boost for a quick drive around the block but then started losing boost now it's at 12 PSI. I'm guessing that the BOV due to it missing a bolt is losing boost atleast that's my theory. If anyone can give me some tip on how to get the rest of the screw out without taking the CV axle out please let me know.
 


PunkST

1000 Post Club
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Menasha
#2
Well youll habe to pull the bov out and see if you can get a vise grip on whats left of the bolt.

Or youll habe to be very careful with a welder and welt a nut onto whats left of the bolt. Or if you can fit two nuts, put two on and try and loosen with the first one ( probably really difficult for the last one.as youll need a small thin wrench and nuts
 


wes

Member
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Location
Kernersville, NC, USA
#4
Well youll habe to pull the bov out and see if you can get a vise grip on whats left of the bolt.

Or youll habe to be very careful with a welder and welt a nut onto whats left of the bolt. Or if you can fit two nuts, put two on and try and loosen with the first one ( probably really difficult for the last one.as youll need a small thin wrench and nuts
You have all the options nailed down. I’ve had luck tapping a small 12 point socket onto the stud as well(if you don’t have a extractor set). For that tight area vice grips(a good pair not made in China) and positive thoughts. Good luck!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 


OP
Itstheweekdy
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Location
Virginia Beach, VA, USA
Thread Starter #5
Thanks everyone for the ideas this is what I'm working with right now I tried to use the vice grips idea. I think I probably do need to get a good quality pair and that should hopefully work. It's out far enough for me to gradually file 2 sides of the bolt to hopefully get a good grip on it. Either that or unfortunately I'm have to take the CV axle out to get to it and use a bolt extractor but that's my last resort. Wish me luck!!
 


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Jacksonville
#6
vice grips, or a reverse rotation drill bit. I had to drill out a broken stud from my turbo drain with that method
 


haste

Senior Member
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#7
Honestly, at this point. It would probably be easier/cheaper just to pull the turbo and remove the broken bolt that way. It's a little more work to pull an axle.
 


OP
Itstheweekdy
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Location
Virginia Beach, VA, USA
Thread Starter #8
Honestly, at this point. It would probably be easier/cheaper just to pull the turbo and remove the broken bolt that way. It's a little more work to pull an axle.
Yeah I was really trying to avoid that :LOL:or wait till I had enough money to buy a hybrid turbo. But with the CV axle in the way I think I might have to. non of the left handed bolts are long enough to reach the broken bolt and I don't wanna get off center and go through my turbo. Unless there is an extension of some sorts reach out further, then I'm kinda screwed if I try to go that method. I bolted back on the BOV I tried to install and it's holding 16psi of boost so hopefully I can just fine tune the spring and get back to the OEM boost to run my car on untill I get the time to take the turbo out or get a hybrid turbo.

One thing is for sure don't be stupid like me and rush through seemingly easy projects:rolleyes:
 


haste

Senior Member
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#9
The turbo is seriously easy to take off this car from the top. It would be good practice for you if the intention is to upgrade later.
 


Rocketst

Senior Member
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#10
Fuck that just throw a nut on that bolt after cleaning with a thread tap and call it a day... Never touch it again lol

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 


Rocketst

Senior Member
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#12
I'm kidding of course.... What you want to do is grind the bolt flat being very careful not to grind the face of the turbo. Then using a small drill bit drill a pilot hole into the center. After that drill a slightly larger hole but not too large that you hit then threads. After that I'd personally take a punch or similar or a bolt extractor and hammer it into that hole I created and remove it.

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 


OP
Itstheweekdy
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Location
Virginia Beach, VA, USA
Thread Starter #13
The turbo is seriously easy to take off this car from the top. It would be good practice for you if the intention is to upgrade later.
Can you link me to a thread with the instructions and tools that I need also if they're are videos for it also that would be awesome. Tried to take it out today and still having issues so I guess I'm be taking out the turbo next weekend:cry:
 


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#14
What you have done is bottom out that bolt in the tapped hole for it and breaking the head off the screw indicates that it is really seized in place. Right now odds are about 50/50 that remainder will snap off at the start of the threads when you try to remove it. That is NOT a good thing, it's quite possible you may end up needing a new engine block. Yeah, this could get that bad.

I would advise that you don't even attempt any shortcuts. Pull the Turbo then the BOV. Then you may have enough to clamp on to give you a ghost of a chance of clamping on it hard enough to get it to move. If you do get it to move DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE IT IN ONE CONTINUOUS MOTION. I expect that you'll find that there is a tendency to bind up as you unscrew the bolt. If so this means that you will need to WALK the bolt out 1/4 to 1/2 turn at a time. Loosen 1/2 turn and when it starts to bind turn it back and forth until it frees up for that amount of motion. Then proceed another 1/2 turn. Keep doing this until it's out, EVEN IF IT TAKES 2 FULL HOURS TO GET IT OUT. BTW, I've been there done this with a motorcycle that had sat so long every fastener in the engine was corroded in place. Did not snap one single screw.

Note, if you do have to drill out that screw your best option for repair is to plan on changing that tapped hole to an 8mm thread or 6mm helicoil. The way I would approach doing this would to have a machine shop make up a hardened drill bushing out of Oil Hardening with the ID sized for the tap drill being used to repair the hole. Then have them make up a guide plate with all of the mounting holes in place and that hardened bushing press fit at the repair position. BTW my preference is to use a helicoil, they work well and allow you retain the stock thread size. Down side to helicoils is they can come out when you remove a screw. Due to this I suggest using a stud for this hole position if you go with a helicoil.

If you do get the screw out successfully then you'll want to purchase a tap and re-tap the hole, because I expect the threads are probably a bit damaged. I would also suggest that you purchase 3 taps and use a bench grinder to convert those 3 taps into a bottoming tap set by taking two taps and grinding off some of the lead. Then purchase some high strength (grade 8) threaded rod and make and fit a stud to that tapped hole. Because it is possible that those threads are partially sheared from the force you put on them and using those extra threads of that bottom tapped hole with a stud may allow you to restore function to that position. If not going to an 8mm hole may be the best option for repair but you could also get a helicoil set and install a 6mm helicoil. BTW; helicoil sets are NOT cheap but do work well in steel or aluminum and can be purchased from MSC Industrial Supply.

PS; Two notes. One is that we have torque wrenches for a reason and one reason is to avoid mistakes like this. Two, the difference between 22 INCHES and 22mm is approximately 21 Inches. You may wish to edit your first post. You sure had me scratching my head trying to figure out where Ford would use a 22 inch screw on this engine.
 


Last edited:
OP
Itstheweekdy
Messages
16
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5
Location
Virginia Beach, VA, USA
Thread Starter #15
What you have done is bottom out that bolt in the tapped hole for it and breaking the head off the screw indicates that it is really seized in place. Right now odds are about 50/50 that remainder will snap off at the start of the threads when you try to remove it. That is NOT a good thing, it's quite possible you may end up needing a new engine block. Yeah, this could get that bad.

I would advise that you don't even attempt any shortcuts. Pull the CV Joints and remove that the whole works. Then you may have enough to clamp on to give you a ghost of a chance of clamping on it hard enough to get it to move. If you do get it to move DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE IT IN ONE CONTINUOUS MOTION. I expect that you'll find that there is a tendency to bind up as you unscrew the bolt. If so this means that you will need to WALK the bolt out 1/4 to 1/2 turn at a time. Loosen 1/2 turn and when it starts to bind turn it back and forth until it frees up for that amount of motion. Then proceed another 1/2 turn. Keep doing this until it's out, EVEN IF IT TAKES 2 FULL HOURS TO GET IT OUT. BTW, I've been there done this with a motorcycle that had sat so long every fastener in the engine was corroded in place. Did not snap one single screw.

Note, if you do have to drill out that screw your best option for repair is to plan on changing that tapped hole to an 8mm thread or 6mm helicoil. The way I would approach doing this would to have a machine shop make up a hardened drill bushing out of Oil Hardening with the ID sized for the tap drill being used to repair the hole. Then have them make up a guide plate with all of the mounting holes in place and that hardened bushing press fit at the repair position. BTW my preference is to use a helicoil, they work well in aluminum and allow you retain the stock thread size. Down side to helicoils is they can come out when you remove a screw. Due to this I suggest using a stud for this hole position if you go with a helicoil.

If you do get the screw out successfully then you'll want to purchase a tap and re-tap the hole, because I expect the threads are probably a bit damaged. I would also suggest that you purchase 3 taps and use a bench grinder to convert those 3 taps into a bottoming tap set by taking two taps and grinding off some of the lead. Then purchase some high strength (grade 8) threaded rod and make and fit a stud to that tapped hole. Because it is possible that those threads are partially sheared from the force you put on them and using those extra threads of that bottom tapped hole with a stud may allow you to restore function to that position. If not going to an 8mm hole may be the best option for repair but you could also get a helicoil set and install a 6mm helicoil. BTW< helicoils sets are NOT cheap but do work well in aluminum and can be purchased from MSC Industrial Supply.

PS; Two notes. One is that we have torque wrenches for a reason and one reason is to avoid mistakes like this. Two, the difference between 22 INCHES and 22mm is approximately 21 Inches. You may wish to edit your first post. You sure had me scratching my head trying to figure out where Ford would use a 22 inch screw on this engine.
Why would I need a new engine block if the bolt is stuck in the turbo?
 


OP
Itstheweekdy
Messages
16
Likes
5
Location
Virginia Beach, VA, USA
Thread Starter #17
What you have done is bottom out that bolt in the tapped hole for it and breaking the head off the screw indicates that it is really seized in place. Right now odds are about 50/50 that remainder will snap off at the start of the threads when you try to remove it. That is NOT a good thing, it's quite possible you may end up needing a new engine block. Yeah, this could get that bad.

I would advise that you don't even attempt any shortcuts. Pull the Turbo then the BOV. Then you may have enough to clamp on to give you a ghost of a chance of clamping on it hard enough to get it to move. If you do get it to move DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE IT IN ONE CONTINUOUS MOTION. I expect that you'll find that there is a tendency to bind up as you unscrew the bolt. If so this means that you will need to WALK the bolt out 1/4 to 1/2 turn at a time. Loosen 1/2 turn and when it starts to bind turn it back and forth until it frees up for that amount of motion. Then proceed another 1/2 turn. Keep doing this until it's out, EVEN IF IT TAKES 2 FULL HOURS TO GET IT OUT. BTW, I've been there done this with a motorcycle that had sat so long every fastener in the engine was corroded in place. Did not snap one single screw.

Note, if you do have to drill out that screw your best option for repair is to plan on changing that tapped hole to an 8mm thread or 6mm helicoil. The way I would approach doing this would to have a machine shop make up a hardened drill bushing out of Oil Hardening with the ID sized for the tap drill being used to repair the hole. Then have them make up a guide plate with all of the mounting holes in place and that hardened bushing press fit at the repair position. BTW my preference is to use a helicoil, they work well and allow you retain the stock thread size. Down side to helicoils is they can come out when you remove a screw. Due to this I suggest using a stud for this hole position if you go with a helicoil.

If you do get the screw out successfully then you'll want to purchase a tap and re-tap the hole, because I expect the threads are probably a bit damaged. I would also suggest that you purchase 3 taps and use a bench grinder to convert those 3 taps into a bottoming tap set by taking two taps and grinding off some of the lead. Then purchase some high strength (grade 8) threaded rod and make and fit a stud to that tapped hole. Because it is possible that those threads are partially sheared from the force you put on them and using those extra threads of that bottom tapped hole with a stud may allow you to restore function to that position. If not going to an 8mm hole may be the best option for repair but you could also get a helicoil set and install a 6mm helicoil. BTW; helicoil sets are NOT cheap but do work well in steel or aluminum and can be purchased from MSC Industrial Supply.

PS; Two notes. One is that we have torque wrenches for a reason and one reason is to avoid mistakes like this. Two, the difference between 22 INCHES and 22mm is approximately 21 Inches. You may wish to edit your first post. You sure had me scratching my head trying to figure out where Ford would use a 22 inch screw on this engine.
Thank you for the advice and everything so I should take my car to a fabrication shop? I'm show a picture of where the broken bolt is on the turbo for reference.
 


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haste

Senior Member
Messages
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Location
Eastern
#18
It would be a lot cheaper to remove the turbo/manifold as one assembly and remove the broken bolt yourself.
 


Messages
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214
Location
Metro Detroit
#19
The reason I mentioned an Engine Block is because I've actually seen it happen. In hindsight I'll grant that I probably shouldn't have said that and will admit to a bit of brain fade here. However it does point out what can happen if we get foolish when working with something that does bolt to the block.
 


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