• Sign Up! To view all forums and unlock additional cool features

    Welcome to the #1 Fiesta ST Forum and Fiesta ST community dedicated to Fiesta ST owners and enthusiasts. Register for an account, it's free and it's easy, so don't hesitate to join the Fiesta ST Forum today!


Mechanic messed up clutch replacement, recommendations for low cost alternatives?

sbfiestase

New Member
Messages
2
Likes
0
Location
Santa Barbara
#1
Just over three months ago I paid a mechanic $800 in labor to replace my clutch, slave cylinder, flywheel, rear main seal, the whole shebang. I had to debate whether or not to even spend the money to do it, since the clutch was "fine" but I bought the car at 130k miles and the clutch hadn't been replaced yet. I opted to go ahead with it since I want to keep this car for a while.

Unfortunately, the mechanic did not do the replacement correctly and the clutch slave cylinder is leaking brake fluid (has been since I got the car back, but I didn't realize the issue until last week). Also unfortunately, I moved to a new state and so I can't take the car to the old mechanic to have them fix the job they did incorrectly the first time.

I usually work on the car myself, but I won't do transmission or A/C things. I'm not flush with cash, and so it hurts to have to pay someone to fix the problem I already paid someone else to do. Many local mechanics I've talked to are quoting me near $1000 to do the fix, and I cannot afford that at the moment. Do folks recommend any honest Fiesta mechanics around southern California who they might recommend? I'm also happy to drive to you if you have a transmission jack and experience replacing the slave cylinder... only $40 in parts but hundreds in labor it seems!
 


Messages
457
Likes
526
Location
Metro Detroit
#2
You now live in one of the most expensive areas in the entire country to live and you want a budget transmission repair. What does it cost to rent a nice 1 bedroom apartment in your area. That is roughly what the cost will be to have a real professional shop will be. Because those shops also have to pay rental or a mortgage for that shop. To be honest those quoting a 1000 dollars to this job are likely working in their back yard. You have already tried the budget route once and have seen the results, a job done poorly. I would suggest you get a couple of cases of beer and have some mechanically minded friends over for the weekend and do it yourself.
 


OP
S

sbfiestase

New Member
Messages
2
Likes
0
Location
Santa Barbara
Thread Starter #3
You are very correct. Santa Barbara is painfully expensive, and the pro shops have quoted me $1200-1800 for the repair. Have you dropped the transmission before? Am I looking at a full day or a full weekend, or longer for this? (I've done full suspension, brakes on my car so I am a bit familiar)
 


TyphoonFiST

9000 Post Club
Premium Account
Messages
11,543
Likes
8,045
Location
Rich-fizzield
#4
You are very correct. Santa Barbara is painfully expensive, and the pro shops have quoted me $1200-1800 for the repair. Have you dropped the transmission before? Am I looking at a full day or a full weekend, or longer for this? (I've done full suspension, brakes on my car so I am a bit familiar)
By yourself with some mechanical skills..id say 2-3 days With encountering issues as we all know nothing goes according to plan. With a couple of buddies and the right tools... 1 day*
 


Messages
456
Likes
564
Location
Riverside,CA
#5
The clutch doesn't involve you opening the transmission, just taking it off. If you are up to it and want to save maximum money. (assuming you have weekends off) I would start on a Friday night by draining fluids, loosening easy to access bolts and make as much progress as possible. Have the goal for Saturday to be get the trans off by noon. Noon to the afternoon get the clutch fitted and throw the trans back on. Sunday finish buttoning up putting the trans on and replace fluids.
If possible invited any friends you may have. If this is a secondary car you could probably put the car on jack stands and do it as you have time. If its a primary car I would do the weekend approach.
 


Ton

Member
Messages
10
Likes
17
Location
Minnesota
#6
You will have a certain level of pride and you’ll become one with your Fist if you do it yourself. Biggest hurdle is to get over the fear. There are tons of resources online to walk you through the process and you don’t really need a ton of specific tools. Good luck!
 


Sam4

Senior Member
Messages
851
Likes
665
Location
West Chester, PA, USA
#7
I'm compelled to chime in. I just had a positive experience with my local Ford DEALER! They did trans, clutch and exhaust, happy to install MY provided parts, including slave cylinder. Talk to their service people - in person - interview them!
 


Messages
262
Likes
297
Location
Morris, CT, USA
#8
Anyone else thinking the little rubber piece from the old slave cylinder that slips onto the hydraulic line never got removed and transfered back onto the hydralic line that goes into and clipped onto the new slave cylinder? New slave cylinders don't come with this piece and if your rushing this job it's easy to throw the old slave cylinder away before realizing theres a tiny rubber piece you need to take out of it with a pick and transfer it back onto the hydraulic line before reconnecting it to the new slave. I would check to see if your leak is coming from that area. If it is then most likely this is your problem. It is located on the outside of the transmission and if this is the case its a cheap easy fix. Undo the little metal clip, Pull the Line out, Check the the end of the line for a black rubber piece connected to it (its about the length or an eraser on the end of a pencil), If not there try to take a metal pic and see if you can feel something in there, If nothings there then that's definitely your issue. Put the new rubber piece on the end of it, send it back home put the clip on and re bleed the system. If the clip wont line up after putting the new missing rubber piece back on then that piece isn't missing and you can disregard everything I've just said. I would definitely recommend draining fluid before removing that or any lines but try to locate where the fluid is coming from before doing so.
 


Intuit

3000 Post Club
Messages
3,731
Likes
2,311
Location
South West Ohio
#10
Learned with the prior car not to do "preventative" maintenance like that. The aftermarket reman parts more often than not were complete junk. There's the old saying, "If you want it done right..." ...well, at least if done wrong you then know who to blame and likely what was done wrong. Besides that it's just a learning experience and whatever next service you engage in becomes that much easier.

I'm compelled to chime in. I just had a positive experience with my local Ford DEALER! They did trans, clutch and exhaust, happy to install MY provided parts, including slave cylinder. Talk to their service people - in person - interview them!
You got lucky. Time to play the Lotto... 😜
 




Top