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koozy

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This is actually excellent info for me, being also a LA resident.

I was thinking of a Swift/Koni setup.

I have used Eibachs on other cars. My Ground Control coilovers on my M3 come with them and they do not ride bad. Except for the fact that Eibachs do tend to sag over time and you will find a height drop with them 6 months to a year after install.

That is the reason I am looking at other spring options.
The springs being made by a reputable co. like KW Germany was an important deciding factor for me. I didn't want to deal with sagging springs or un-matched sets.
 


LILIKE16ST

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The st springs are sold on the whoosh website for like 225 bucks at least last time I checked they were listed. Seems like a very nice spring I'd probably have went with those had I not went swifts. The swifts seem like the perfect drop for what i want and the perfect rate. They're in effect linear when the car is on the ground and that is all that matters. The ride height drop for st are listed 1.2 front .6 rear. That may be why they're true linear and not dual rate...the swifts are 1.1 front 1.0 rear and from what I have read need to be dual rate in order to keep the spring seated at full travel or whatever being that the drop is as low as it is. I may be wrong that is the gist of it from what I understand. Thst said the st springs look pretty good as well on the couple cars I have seen them on. I just wanted more of a drop in the rear and more of a level all around drop. Both are very good options.
 


M-Sport fan

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Swifts are linear spring rate. If you want to get technical, they are dual rate. However, the lower rate is not in effect once the car is on the ground as they collapse fully. They are there to hold the spring in place at full extension. Here's spring rate testing of the various spring manufacturers by Red Shift.

Click here for link.

Just because a spring is wound in a liner fashion, they could still be "progressive" in spring rate. Example would be BC Racing's springs they use for their coilovers. Initial travel aside, their springs increase in rate when it is increasingly compressed. In comparison, Swift springs stay liner for the majority of the travel.



^^^

The Swifts are not progressive, they are a dual rate spring that is effectively linear as the tighter wound section collapse together once the car is on the ground.
CORRECT!

The progressive 'looking' section is really there to just function like a 'tender spring' on a coil over setup, as per Swift Tech (yes, I spoke with them directly by phone). ;)
 


M-Sport fan

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This is actually excellent info for me, being also a LA resident.

I was thinking of a Swift/Koni setup.

I have used Eibachs on other cars. My Ground Control coilovers on my M3 come with them and they do not ride bad. Except for the fact that Eibachs do tend to sag over time and you will find a height drop with them 6 months to a year after install.

That is the reason I am looking at other spring options.
The Eibachs used on the GC conversion setups (or at least the ones I've ever used) are LINEAR ONLY, unlike the ones Eibach markets for our factory sized strut setups.
Whereas the ones used on the Bilstein B14 coil over kits are progressive, which is WHY I will no go with those since their techs told me to NOT install a LINEAR rate 2.5" I.D. coil over spring on them due to being valved ONLY specifically FOR progressive rate springs. ;)
 


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LILIKE16ST

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195/55/15 bfg sport comp 2 right now. I'll probably replace them within a couple months with some continental extreme contact sport in 205/50 as these are getting towards the end of their life I've passes 20k with them so far could prob make it to 30 easily I may not push it that far and go ahead and make the switch fairly soon.
 


LILIKE16ST

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swift spec r springs with stock shocks and struts and 15x8 team dynamics pro race 1.2 wheels with +35 and 195/55/15 bfg sport comp 2 tires





here is a couple before spring pictures with the same wheels





 


Adub

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Anyone's opinion on getting the Swift Spec-r springs with a 2017-2018? I know Ford have changed the spring rate and shocks on the mid 2016-2018 to be softer. Which brings me to the question of will these work with the new updated shocks since Swift specifically designed these for the older 2014-2105 style shock?
 


M-Sport fan

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Anyone's opinion on getting the Swift Spec-r springs with a 2017-2018? I know Ford have changed the spring rate and shocks on the mid 2016-2018 to be softer. Which brings me to the question of will these work with the new updated shocks since Swift specifically designed these for the older 2014-2105 style shock?
GREAT question! [thumb]

But unless someone is willing to put a set of the old and newer dampers on a dyno, we will never know the exact answer to that one. [:(]

(ONE of the reasons why I will not install them until I get a set of Koni Sports to pair with them, IF I don't go with the coming GC coil over conversion on the Koni Sports. ;) )
 


Adub

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That's interesting that you will only get them for those shocks. Forgive me if I am wrong, but aren't those springs only designed to function correctly with stock 14-15 shocks? I wonder if [MENTION=5976]ron@whoosh[/MENTION] has any comments on how these function...I know he has commented on these springs in the past and I think he has a 17 ST.
 


danbfree

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What are you guys on about? Springs are springs, they will work with any shock. Sure, they may have been "optimized" for the earlier dampers (what ever that actually means), but they work perfectly fine on a '17 model. I know because I have them - they seem to ride better than the stockers. If I prematurely wear out the stock shocks, then I'll move up to Koni's or Billi's at that point.
 


danbfree

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What are you guys on about? Springs are springs, they will work with any shock. Sure, they may have been "optimized" for the earlier dampers (what ever that actually means), but they work perfectly fine on a '17 model. I know because I have them - they seem to ride better than the stockers. If I prematurely wear out the stock shocks, then I'll move up to Koni's or Billi's at that point.
Exactly, shocks (dampers in racer language) are shocks and springs are springs, if they fit our car, then all can be mixed or matched... I don't think there have been much changed on the rates, if anything it must have been very small... Anyway, the SPRING rate and if they are linear or progressive is what people should focus on.
 


Adub

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Exactly, shocks (dampers in racer language) are shocks and springs are springs, if they fit our car, then all can be mixed or matched... I don't think there have been much changed on the rates, if anything it must have been very small... Anyway, the SPRING rate and if they are linear or progressive is what people should focus on.
They definitely have changed the springs and shocks/ dampers to what extent is hard to determine. But what we know for sure if that the combo is definitely softer. See info below:

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?sh...com/forum/showthread.php?t=15849&share_type=t

And

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?s....com/forum/showthread.php?t=8687&share_type=t

My concern was exactly what was stated above, that the stock shocks/ dampers would wear out much quicker and that the springs would not perform the same because of the compression of the spring changing as result of the softer shock as the Swift spec-r springs are actually a dual spring type (confirmed) that act linearly. Quoting @nivek from Reddit: "Swift supposidly dynoed the stock dampers and then specified the spring rates to the maximum the stock dampers will handle. Swift springs are definitly worth it since their specified spring rates are absolutely spot on.

Surprisingly nobody posted pictures of the Swift spring itself for the FiST. That said, they're either linear, or dual rate. What dual rate means is there's a "lighter" section to keep tension on the spring against the damper so at full extension it won't rattle around and to help push the damper out at full extension as well."

I know [MENTION=1313]BRGT350[/MENTION] is suspension engineer. Maybe he could help answer if the change in shocks would have a major affect on the Swift springs and performance of the vehicle.
 


danbfree

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They definitely have changed the springs and shocks to what extent is hard to determine. But what we know for sure if that the combo is definitely softer. See info below:

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?sh...com/forum/showthread.php?t=15849&share_type=t

And

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?s....com/forum/showthread.php?t=8687&share_type=t

My concern was exactly what was stated above, that the stock shocks would wear out much quicker and that the springs would not perform the same because of the compression of the spring changing as result of the softer shock as the Swift spec-r springs are actually a dual spring type (confirmed) that act linearly. Quoting @nivek from Reddit: "Swift supposidly dynoed the stock dampers and then specified the spring rates to the maximum the stock dampers will handle. Swift springs are definitly worth it since their specified spring rates are absolutely spot on.

Surprisingly nobody posted pictures of the Swift spring itself for the FiST. That said, they're either linear, or dual rate. What dual rate means is there's a "lighter" section to keep tension on the spring against the damper so at full extension it won't rattle around and to help push the damper out at full extension as well."

I know [MENTION=1313]BRGT350[/MENTION] is suspension engineer. Maybe he could help answer if the change in shocks would have a major affect on the springs.
Well damn, good to know! It seems the factory suspension does take some time to break-in, I notice mine now at 2k miles isn't quite as harsh as brand new. Also, since I want an even more slightly forgiving suspension on my '17 (also glad to hear it has stiffer torsion beam and front sway bar) I'm going to go with progressive springs, which with them lowering too of course, I hear still makes them handle better too. I think with that bit of forgiving going with progressive, that the stock shocks should last a bit longer too.
 


ron@whoosh

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What are you guys on about? Springs are springs, they will work with any shock. Sure, they may have been "optimized" for the earlier dampers (what ever that actually means), but they work perfectly fine on a '17 model. I know because I have them - they seem to ride better than the stockers. If I prematurely wear out the stock shocks, then I'll move up to Koni's or Billi's at that point.
What springs are you running?
 


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