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Brake job mistake

dmb

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its amazing their isn't a wreck every 1/4 mile the way people drive, and don't get me going on the idiot truck drivers driving like they are in cars. wait till it rains gridlock everywhere.
 

JDG

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This is literally what I thought too. I had done 6 brake jobs prior without any issues not caused my corroded slide pins or seized rotor retainer bolts that needed to be drilled out. I even finished the install in an hour. But when I went to go bed the brake pads in, I knew something was wrong when the brakes felt real soft and I could not engage the ABS in the front. Got back to my house and noticed that there was fluid leaking from each front caliper piston. I did each side one at a time, so the issue was not what you describe. The brake pad was completely gone on the old pad (metal on metal) so I am wondering if this contributed to something.

Hoping the new calipers plus a brake bleed will solve my issues unlike the OP.
The new calipers fixed the issue. I have not yet pulled the pistons out of the old calipers yet but I plan to do so and post photos of any damage.
 
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+1 on the caliper tool. They're so cheap there's no reason you shouldn't own one if you're doing your own work.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B012N18WIU

Seriously, just get it. I had picked this one up a long while back as a cheapie/disposable tool but it's been nothing short of bulletproof.
Thank you for the suggestion! I'll definitely buy this considering this is the first car that has had the rear brake set-up that requires a tool. You got this exact one?
 

Ford ST

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The new calipers fixed the issue. I have not yet pulled the pistons out of the old calipers yet but I plan to do so and post photos of any damage.
Good deal. Sometimes if you wear the pads completely out it can cause the caliper piston to extend a little too far out. Glad you got it fixed.

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
 

Krug

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Thank you for the suggestion! I'll definitely buy this considering this is the first car that has had the rear brake set-up that requires a tool. You got this exact one?
That's the one, yes. I had ordered it because it was very cheap and I figured that if I only got a few uses out of it, hey, whatever - at least it would've made my life easier for a couple of brake changes. It's been a champ through dozens of brake jobs and has given me no reason to replace it. I believe it's made out of sintered metal and has held up with no issue. I can't see myself going back to the C-Clamp method unless I have no choice.

The new calipers fixed the issue. I have not yet pulled the pistons out of the old calipers yet but I plan to do so and post photos of any damage.
Have you located the source of the leak? Sounds like you might've unseated/damaged your piston dust boot.
 

JDG

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That's the one, yes. I had ordered it because it was very cheap and I figured that if I only got a few uses out of it, hey, whatever - at least it would've made my life easier for a couple of brake changes. It's been a champ through dozens of brake jobs and has given me no reason to replace it. I believe it's made out of sintered metal and has held up with no issue. I can't see myself going back to the C-Clamp method unless I have no choice.



Have you located the source of the leak? Sounds like you might've unseated/damaged your piston dust boot.
Both the dust boots looks like they had remained seated BUT on the one caliper, I was able to see dirt and some grit under the dust boot when I pryed it back. I am thinking there may be an issue with the dust boot design that is letting dirt and moisture get past it causing wear to occur on the piston seal (which eventually caused the leak). Can be certain until the calipers are fully disassembled though.
 
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My Stop Tech SS lines should be arriving today. Question: What size line wrenches do I need for caliper and hard line sides?
 

CSM

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Both the dust boots looks like they had remained seated BUT on the one caliper, I was able to see dirt and some grit under the dust boot when I pryed it back. I am thinking there may be an issue with the dust boot design that is letting dirt and moisture get past it causing wear to occur on the piston seal (which eventually caused the leak). Can be certain until the calipers are fully disassembled though.
This is the exact thing that happened to me last year. I had a leaky piston seal that was caused by the piston rusting which compromised the seal. I replaced the piston and installed new seals and everything has been great
 
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Hey CSM, not sure if you saw my post, but do you know/remember what size line wrenches needed on the brake lines? Thanks
 

CSM

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Hey CSM, not sure if you saw my post, but do you know/remember what size line wrenches needed on the brake lines? Thanks
I don't remember exactly. Maybe a 10mm flare wrench? You absolutely need a flare wrench for the job
 

alexrex20

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If your car os a 2014 and has 100k miles in the rust belt, maybe. My fittings loosened up just fine with normal combo wrenches. I believe it was a 10 and a 17.

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Thanks alexrex20. Mine is a 2014 with about 95k however not the rust belt thank goodness. I was just up under the car on Monday when I installed the Pierce 6 point brace and everything looked clean/rust free. I think I read on here you have the 6 point as well? I'll be doing a full review of it soon and post up.
 

CSM

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Thanks alexrex20. Mine is a 2014 with about 95k however not the rust belt thank goodness. I was just up under the car on Monday when I installed the Pierce 6 point brace and everything looked clean/rust free. I think I read on here you have the 6 point as well? I'll be doing a full review of it soon and post up.
I know I'll get shit for this but I still think flare wrenches are a must for brake lines. Trust me if you've ever had to replace a rounded banjo bolt you'll know what I'm talking about. I see it as insurance policy from having to deal with that headache PITA again
 

Intuit

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I know I'll get shit for this but I still think flare wrenches are a must for brake lines. Trust me if you've ever had to replace a rounded banjo bolt you'll know what I'm talking about. I see it as insurance policy from having to deal with that headache PITA again
By the time you realize that you actually need one, it'll probably already be too late. Strip!
 

LaserWhisperer

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I have a caliper tool which works great. I also have used a HUSKY wood clamp and an old brake pad. Also used a C-clamp.
All worked fine.

I didn't crack any bleeder screws, rather I cracked the cap on my reservoir (in San Diego, very low humidity so I wasn't particularly worried about the hygroscopic nature of brake fluid) and placed a rag under the MC.

My calipers drove back in, no problem. Fluid didn't overflow, either. When I replaced my front lines for STOPTECH SS lines, I didn't have any issues bleeding or with pedal feel after I was done. Guess I'm just damn good at brakes on my fiesta??[dunno]
 

CSM

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I have a caliper tool which works great. I also have used a HUSKY wood clamp and an old brake pad. Also used a C-clamp.
All worked fine.

I didn't crack any bleeder screws, rather I cracked the cap on my reservoir (in San Diego, very low humidity so I wasn't particularly worried about the hygroscopic nature of brake fluid) and placed a rag under the MC.

My calipers drove back in, no problem. Fluid didn't overflow, either. When I replaced my front lines for STOPTECH SS lines, I didn't have any issues bleeding or with pedal feel after I was done. Guess I'm just damn good at brakes on my fiesta??[dunno]
[clap][clap][clap] good job
 

TyphoonFiST

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I know I'll get shit for this but I still think flare wrenches are a must for brake lines. Trust me if you've ever had to replace a rounded banjo bolt you'll know what I'm talking about. I see it as insurance policy from having to deal with that headache PITA again
I will agree with this statement 100% along with Tranny lines also they belong! F-that open ended shit on those nuts![raceflag]
 
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I have a caliper tool which works great. I also have used a HUSKY wood clamp and an old brake pad. Also used a C-clamp.
All worked fine.

I didn't crack any bleeder screws, rather I cracked the cap on my reservoir (in San Diego, very low humidity so I wasn't particularly worried about the hygroscopic nature of brake fluid) and placed a rag under the MC.

My calipers drove back in, no problem. Fluid didn't overflow, either. When I replaced my front lines for STOPTECH SS lines, I didn't have any issues bleeding or with pedal feel after I was done. Guess I'm just damn good at brakes on my fiesta??[dunno]
This is a bit comforting to know- because after reading this thread I have had a bit of aprehension about installing my SS lines. I've done pads twice with no problem. It seems so easy [wrenchin]- but I do NOT want these mystery problems and nightmare situations to happen to me since this is my daily.

These are the steps Im thinking to use: (car on jack stands) Working furthest to closest to Master Cylinder, and quickly swaping old to new line connections to minimize loss of fluid/air getting in

1. Open reservoir cap
2. unscrew mount tab on OEM line
3. remove spring clip at hard line side
4. crimp rubber OEM line
5. loosen nut on both ends of the OEM line
6. unscrew old line off caliper side/screw new line on caliper
7. then same process for hard line side(quickly)
8. bleed air out of new line
9. Install clip and screw in mounting tab
9. Repeat above 3 more times

What do you guys think? Have I missed anything? I just want to go into this as prepared as can be.

Can you describe your SS line install LaserWhisperer? (Since yours went right/no problems)[raceflag]
 

LaserWhisperer

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This is a bit comforting to know- because after reading this thread I have had a bit of aprehension about installing my SS lines. I've done pads twice with no problem. It seems so easy [wrenchin]- but I do NOT want these mystery problems and nightmare situations to happen to me since this is my daily.

These are the steps Im thinking to use: (car on jack stands) Working furthest to closest to Master Cylinder, and quickly swaping old to new line connections to minimize loss of fluid/air getting in

1. Open reservoir cap
2. unscrew mount tab on OEM line
3. remove spring clip at hard line side
4. crimp rubber OEM line
5. loosen nut on both ends of the OEM line
6. unscrew old line off caliper side/screw new line on caliper
7. then same process for hard line side(quickly)
8. bleed air out of new line
9. Install clip and screw in mounting tab
9. Repeat above 3 more times

What do you guys think? Have I missed anything? I just want to go into this as prepared as can be.

Can you describe your SS line install LaserWhisperer? (Since yours went right/no problems)[raceflag]
Your process looks fine to me, although I did bleed the new lines using the caliper bleed screw. Keep in mind though, to make sure your fluid level in the reservoir doesn't drop too much when bleeding, otherwise you run the risk of introducing more air into the system. I just kept a bottle of DOT4 next to the MC and checked in between bleeds.
That's basically how I did it, again with no issues
 

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